Today I’m talking to Deanna who retired as a physicist from the US air force. She had unexplained pain in her abdomen, and then was told she had ovarian cancer. She tried to heal holistically by eating an organic raw vegan diet. Within a few months the cancer marker levels dropped and the tumor shrank. But then she went back to working 16-18 hours days, traveling, and not keeping up her super healthy eating style. Within a few months, she was admitted into hospice and was told she had 4 weeks left to live. But today she is telling her inspirational story.

To find out more about ovarian cancer, please download the one-pager available here

In this interview I talk to Caroline, who was first diagnosed with migraine at 7 years old and who is now 35 years old. She talks about her experience with chronic daily migraine, which she experiences several times a week. She talks about how she manages this chronic and debilitating condition, the medication she uses, and her participation in clinical trials. While Caroline to her condition, she did want to let people know that it’s not just a headache but it manifests as fatigue and pain throughout her body and is extremely debilitating.

There are two main subtypes of migraine: chronic migraine, which is more than 15 headache days per month. The other migraine sub-type is episodic migraine, which is defined as less than 15 headache days per month. The causes of migraines are unclear and there is currently no cure for migraine, but several treatments may reduce the frequency and severity of migraines.

As you will hear today, some people with migraine use several combinations of treatments and have to work out what is most effective for them. To find out more about this condition, please download the one-pager on chronic migraine.

Please note every condition is different, even if it’s the same diagnosis. Please consult your healthcare provider for medical advice. Thank you!

If you would like to be on the Patients Speak Out podcast, please email info@psomedia.com or fill out this form.

If you know someone who has a condition that we are talking about please share it with them, and maybe they can share it in their support groups they may be in

Today’s episode is a patient stories, and those come out on Thursdays, but I hope you will also join me on Tuesdays each week when I discuss the latest new drug approvals coming out of the FDA.

If you like this podcast, please subscribe, rate and review it! Thank you!

In this episode, I’m talking to Brett who is the father of Angelina, his 7 year old daughter, who was diagnosed with Joubert Syndrome. In the last year, Angelina, who is nonverbal, has learned how to sign and goes to a regular elementary school. He says “The world’s out there telling her what she is not going to be able to do”, and he says it’s his job to tell her what she can do. A truly inspirational story.

Joubert syndrome is disorder of brain development that is characterized by the absence or underdevelopment of the cerebellar vermis (a part of the brain that controls balance and coordination) and a malformed brain stem (connection between the brain and spinal cord). Joubert syndrome may be caused by mutations in several genes and is present at birth. Joubert syndrome is present in about 1 out of 100,000 people. Signs and symptoms of Joubert syndrome vary but can include weak muscle tone, abnormal breathing patterns, lack of muscle coordination, and intellectual disability. Symptoms can range from mild to quite severe. To find out more about this condition, please download the one-pager.

Thanks for listening today! A quick note, please remember that every condition is different, even if it’s the same diagnosis. Please consult your healthcare provider for medical advice. Thank you.

If you would like to be on the Patients Speak Out podcast, please email info@psomedia.com.

If you like this podcast, please subscribe, rate and review it! Thank you!

Today I am talking to Kelly, who has undergone gastric sleeve surgery, a type of weight loss or bariatric surgery. Over the past year and a half, Kelly has lost 90 lbs with the surgery, which she calls “life changing.”

Gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, is a type of surgery in which the stomach is reduced to about 15% to 20% of its original size, with the formation of a sleeve or tube like structure. The surgery reduces the size of the stomach and is irreversible. The surgery is performed with the use of a laparoscope. The surgery may also impact a number of factors including hunger, satiety, and blood sugar control.

Gastric sleeve surgery induces weight loss similar to other types of gastric surgery procedures. There’s another procedure called the adjustable gastric band, but gastric sleeve surgery requires no foreign objects or bypass or re-routing of the food stream as does another procedure called roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

A disadvantage is that in addition to being  non reversible, gastric sleeve surgery has the potential to cause long-term vitamin deficiencies and has a higher early complication rate than the adjustable gastric band surgery.

Please download the free one-pager here.

Just a reminder that every condition is different, even if it’s the same diagnosis. Please consult your healthcare provider for medical advice. Thank you

If you would like to be on the Patients Speak Out podcast, please email info@psomedia.com or fill out the form.

If you know someone who has a condition that we are talking about please share it with them, and maybe they can share it in their support groups they may be in

Also if you like this podcast, please subscribe, rate and review it! Thank you!

The patient stories come out on Thursdays, but I hope you will also join me on Tuesdays each week when I discuss the latest new drug approvals coming out of the FDA.

Bob has lived with a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation for the last several years. At least 2.7 million Americans are living with atrial fibrillation (also called AFib or AF), which is a quivering or irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related medical conditions.

About 15–20% of people who have strokes have a heart arrhythmia. This clot risk is why patients with this condition are put on blood thinners. Afib is fairly common, especially in older individuals, with 14% of people over 80 years old being affected. Treatment includes blood thinners, such as warfarin and other anticoagulants, which reduce the risk of stroke from AF. In addition, heart rate control may be attempted with various drugs such as beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, or amiodarone.

Please remember every condition is different, even if it’s the same diagnosis. Please consult your healthcare provider for medical advice. Thank you.

Please download the one-pager on atrial fibrillation here

Mvasi (bevacizumab awwb) was approved September 14, 2017 for the treatment of multiple solid tumor types (the same as Avastin). Mvasi is the the first oncology biosimilar to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.
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In this episode, I talk to Linda, a pharmacist who received a diagnosis of giant cell arteritis at a relatively young age of 53 years. If left unchecked, this condition can cause stroke and permanent blindness. She describes the challenges of getting an accurate diagnosis and some of the challenges with treatment.

A quick note, that every condition is different, even if it’s the same diagnosis. Please consult your healthcare provider for medical advice. Thank you.

Download the one page backgrounder on giant cell arteritis.

If you would like to be on the Patients Speak Out podcast, please email info@psomedia.com or you can go to my website PSO media.com and fill out the form there.

If you know someone who has a condition that we are talking about please share it with them, and maybe they can share it in their support groups they may be in also.

If you like this podcast, please subscribe, rate and review it! Thank you!

In this episode, I talk to a special guest, Cecelia, who is mother to 3 children, one of them aged 4 years old and the other two who are twins, and who are nearly two years old. Today Cecelia tells us about her journey with her twins, who have been diagnosed with a condition called ocular motor apraxia in addition to Joubert-like syndrome. She will tell us how she first heard about the diagnosis, the treatment that her twins have gone through so far, what it’s like going through this situation.

A quick note, that every condition is different, even if it’s the same diagnosis. Please consult your healthcare provider for medical advice. Thank you.

Download the one page backgrounder on ocular motor apraxia